Yearly Archives: 2015

Entering and departure maneuvers

Entering maneuver

Arrival and departure maneuvers are the most interesting events that can be witnessed while travelling on board cargo vessels. Passengers may enjoy the beautiful and silent days of long passages while relaxing in the sun, admiring the seascape or enjoying funny and interactive evenings among the crew members in the Recreation Rooms, but they will always arrive on the bridge at the right time to watch the slowly approaching (or leaving), the berthing and unberthing maneuvers no matter how late or early these events take place.

Entering the Port of Napier, New Zealand

Entering Napier

Entering the port of Napier .

The Port of Napier, situated on the West side of Hawke Bay, adjacent to the city of Napier, comprises Breakwater Harbour, the commercial harbor and Napier Inner Harbour, which used to be the commercial harbor before the earthquake in 1931, but now is suitable only for small pleasure boats.

Entering the port of Lyttelton, New Zealand

Entering the port of Lyttelton

Lyttelton Harbour, also known as Whakaraupo, lies in the SW corner of the Pegasus Bay, on the NW side of Banks Peninsula, in the South Island of New Zealand. Situated on an inner harbour in the middle of the North side of Lyttelton Harbour, Lyttelton is a custom and fishing port and a port of entry. It is the principal port of the Canterbury Region of New Zealand and it is situated about 12 miles to the NW from the city of Christchurch.

Going ashore in Hong Kong

View towards Hong Kong featured image

The port of Hong Kong is one of the busiest and biggest in the world. Despite of its huge size and numerous terminals, going out of this port is quite an easy task and it requires only a small effort – from the financial and time consuming point of view. But, with cargo operations going at high speed everywhere in the world – and especially in China – you can consider yourself very lucky if your vessel stays alongside more than 12 hours. If the stay is during daytime and your responsibilities on board allow it, you can take this opportunity and go out of the port for a short walk.

Voyage HS Beethoven (February – July 2015)

Voyage HS Beethoven featured image

My voyage on HS Beethoven started on the 16th of February in the port of Hong Kong where I joined the vessel together with my husband. The ship was chartered for CMA CGM and the trade took us from China and Taiwan to Australia and New Zealand with a bonus port in New Caledonia. As a complete round Hong KongHong Kong lasted 7 weeks, we stayed on board three rounds which extended our voyage to 4 months, 3 weeks and 4 days.

Going ashore in Tauranga, New Zealand

Going ashore in Tauranga

The city of Tauranga is situated in the North Island of New Zealand and it is Bay of Plenty’s main centre. It is located on a spectacular harbour, which provides an attractive waterfront setting for walking and biking during sunny days.

Going ashore in Lyttelton, New Zealand

Going ashore in Lyttelton

Lyttelton is the South Island’s largest port and it is situated on an inner harbour in the middle of the North side of Lyttelton Harbour. It is a small, but picturesque town developed around the port and the hills which surround it.

Entering the Port of Tauranga, NZ

Entering Tauranga

Tauranga Harbour is an extensive harbour, with a mostly low, sandy foreshore, formed between Matakana Island and the mainland to the West. Most of the SE part of the harbour is occupied by shallow or drying banks of sand and shell between which there are a few navigational channels.

Entering/departure Maneuver Port Chalmers, NZ

Entering Port Chalmers

Port Chalmers is one of the three ports which comprise Port Otago and it is a custom port and port of entry serving the Clutha-Central Otago Region of New Zealand.

A new leisure activity on board

Leisure activity on board

Time is passing faster on board if you choose to spend it doing the things you like best. I am talking about the free time, because working hours are just for working and they pass very hard, no matter what you are doing – keeping the navigational watch, working on deck, in the galley or in the engine – regardless of the weather, the outside scenery, the latitude or the date in the calendar.